Spring has sprung

At the beginning of March I wrote an article for the Cheshire Environmental Records Centre newsletter about the garden in springtime.  (You can read it here: Wildlife on your doorstep)

I can’t believe how much the garden has changed since then.  Drifts of snowdrops, crocuses and dwarf iris have faded away only to be replaced by stunning daffodil drifts, primroses and hellebores.

The garden looks lovely at the moment.  There are vibrant yellows, pastel purples, beautiful blues and pure whites.

Drifts of daffodils symbolise that spring has sprung and is now in full swing.  There are so many different varieties and every one of them is beautiful.

The primroses are also looking their best now adding vibrant colour under the trees whilst hellebores add pastel hues to the garden.  Hyacinths also look beautiful at the moment and their heady scent wafts down the garden.

If I had to choose my most favourite flower in the garden at the moment, I think I would choose….snakeshead fritillaria.  I think it’s such a delicate pretty flower.  The pastel shade of purple with chequered pattern is exquisite.

My favourite tree in the garden at the moment has to be the damson tree.  I absolutely love the the delicate pure white blossom and the hoverflies, bees and other insects adore it too.

It’s not just the plants that are taking centre stage in the garden though.  Wildlife is returning to the garden once more.  Those sleepy hedgehogs are waking up, frogs are relaxing under the hibernacula and newts are returning to the pond.

It’s lovely to see the hedgehogs waking up from their hibernation.  They have a big shake, a good old scratch and then waddle off to find food.  (You can see some hedgehog footage here)

The pond is absolutely teaming with life.  In the sunshine I can see caddisfly, flatworms, water daphne and waterlice.

I absolutely love sitting by the pond on a sunny spring day to watch the newts dancing about showing off to one another and laying their eggs on plant leaves.  (You can see some pondlife footage here though the newts are being shy)

 

Spring is such a lovely time of year, it really does lift your spirits.

The garden is bursting with life and colour now so get out there and enjoy it.

 

 

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The “Sol Monath” garden

From the warmth of a cosy room behind a window, the garden looks dead and uninviting at this time of year. But for all those that brave the cold wet February weather will know that the garden is anything but barren and lifeless.
The garden in February sees the start of new life sprouting from the ground and to the Celts indicated a time for new beginnings. February gets its name from the Roman festival of purification called “Februa” but I have heard that there is also an Old English name “Sol Monath.” This means “Mud month” which I think describes the month perfectly.
In the garden at the moment, it’s cold and damp, and the faint sun can be seen hanging low in the sky behind the silhouette of tree branches. At a quick glance the garden doesn’t seem that inviting but as I look around I see signs of life popping up around me.
Bright green moss and beautiful fungi are cheering up the damp areas of the garden, and fresh cyclamen leaves are emerging from under the trees. bountqplrvp.jpg.jpg

Delicate bright green shoots are popping up from the lawn as daffodil bulbs start to awaken, and vibrant crocuses start to bloom.img_20170211_173215.jpg2017-02-12-15-25-16-048.jpg

Hellebore flower heads are just poking up from the ground adding pastel shades to the garden;2017-02-12-15-23-54-419.jpg

whilst primroses and dwarf iris also add a zing of colour.img_20170110_174308.jpg20170211_133736.jpg

I have even seen some weeds starting to appear in the bare soil, a sign that I need to wrap up warm and get out there to do some weeding.

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Snowdrops have got to be my all-time favourite plant in the garden at this time of year as they symbolise the end of a dreary barren winter and the new beginnings of bright joyful spring.img_20170131_172848.jpg

Their lovely bell shaped flowers weigh heavy with raindrops and they are a beautiful sight to see. It won’t be long till the snowdrops can be divided. Just after they have flowered and the leaves are still green is the best time to divide the bulbs into smaller clumps and plant them elsewhere in the garden. I love dividing plants such as snowdrops and primroses as it is like nature’s free gift to me for all the hard work I do in the garden.

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Later on in the day, as I walk around the garden I notice a mole hill that has suddenly appeared in the lawn and there are several blackbirds polishing off some windfall apples under a tree. The tree branches are covered in beautiful lichen, and delicate catkins dangling from the hazel tree are also a lovely feature at this time of year.  It’s lovely to watch them swaying gently on the breeze, waiting ready to drift their pollen into the wind as they seek out a catkin of the opposite sex.img_20170208_174024.jpg

And as I head indoors and the sun sets on the garden, the feathery plumes of the grasses (which have been left for winter interest) are baked in a beautiful warm copper glow.

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Life is anything but dull in the garden in the month of February.